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 River Thames Invasive Species Forum

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CassEdwards

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PostSubject: River Thames Invasive Species Forum   Sat Jan 23, 2010 6:06 pm

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Last edited by CassEdwards on Thu Mar 17, 2011 7:41 pm; edited 1 time in total
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David Harvey

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PostSubject: Re: River Thames Invasive Species Forum   Tue Jan 26, 2010 11:25 pm

Floating Pennywort I have seen strangle strethes of the Colne, Mole and Ember over recent years.

I did speak to the EA about an action plan but they had little resources to assist at that time.

I think this should be put on the action agenda to be followed up. Certainly controlling clubs do have an obligation but again when I engaged BRPS about this there was little reply.

This link is to a google search so if you are not familair with the problem,

http://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=en&q=Ea+floating+pennywort&meta=
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James Page



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PostSubject: Re: River Thames Invasive Species Forum   Wed Jan 27, 2010 7:19 am

indeed sir, although these rivers arent the thames, they do enter into it, I have seen the dreaded floating pennywort happily sailing into the thames from the river mole, one of our problems appears to be that we need to deal with tributaries as well, this is just unachievable in the near future, however, compiling/collating this information is critical, it is not done anywhere else, our conservation officer cannot emphasis this enough, join our club and tell our club what you see and what you should see, but dont
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David Harvey

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PostSubject: Re: River Thames Invasive Species Forum   Wed Jan 27, 2010 10:17 pm

Yes spot on, one to have pending. The removal of FPW is tough as any small bits that break awy in any clearing exersise will easily create more whne washed into a margin. The growth rate is staggering in the summer.

Only true way to clear it is by removing from the river plus the first couple of feet of bankside vegetation.
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Chris Daphne
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PostSubject: Re: River Thames Invasive Species Forum   Thu Jan 28, 2010 11:23 pm

Hello all, i am a fisheries biologist based in Scotland and we/fisheries trusts are releasing Biosecurity plans for consultation. Although i am based about as far North as you can get i will try and help/answer with any questions re Invasives.
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David Harvey

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PostSubject: Re: River Thames Invasive Species Forum   Fri Jan 29, 2010 12:28 am

Great to have you on board Chris, excellent news.
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James Page



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PostSubject: Re: River Thames Invasive Species Forum   Fri Jan 29, 2010 6:47 am

fab and groovy chris, youre input will be extremely important to us all, maybe you could liase with cass [conservation officer], about posting relevant scientific research on here, and add a laymans piece so I can undestand, absolutely gutted about the decline in thames eels, lets get all the science posted on here, so we can figure how we can help
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PostSubject: Re: River Thames Invasive Species Forum   Fri Jan 29, 2010 5:42 pm

Would be happy to get involved. I don't have any background info on the river however. I have done a few articles on invasive species on other sites(yet to be published) and a few eel articles for forums and fish2fork. Just let me know how i can get involved and will be happy to help.
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Chris Daphne
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PostSubject: Re: River Thames Invasive Species Forum   Fri Jan 29, 2010 6:49 pm

I know this isn't really relevant to Thames directly but i thought i would post. Below is an article i wrote for the Sutherland Biodiversity Forum of which i am a member. It really just outlines the Rivers and Fisheries Trust Scotland biosecurity plans. There are some useful links where more info on various species can be found.

Invasive Non Native Species
Cleaning our own doorstep

There are approximately 1000 non native species present in Scotland, the majority exist in small populations with little or no impact on the native flora and fauna. There is however a small, significant proportion that are deemed invasive non native species (INNS) - species that have been transported outside of their natural range and that damage our environment, the economy and the way we live. These are seen as the second greatest threat to biodiversity and can rapidly colonise a wide range of habitats pushing out native species.
Over the last 400 years INNS have contributed to 40% of animal extinctions where the cause of extinction is known. Water acts as an excellent transport medium for the dispersal of many of these species, rivers, lochs and shorelines are the most vulnerable areas to introduction. Already threatened species are at further risk from INNS as are the natural productivity and amenity value of waterbodies.
The threat is increasing rapidly aided by climate change, pollution and habitat disturbance with many countries including Scotland facing complex and costly problems associated with INNS. For example:
 DEFRA have estimated that INNS cost the UK economy at least £2 billion per year
 In the UK Japanese Knotweed is thought to affect an area roughly the size of London and report of the Review of Non-Native Species Policy 2003 has estimated the total cost of its removal using current techniques at £1.56 billion.
 A Scottish Govt report estimated the potential Net economic value loss to Scotland of the introduction of Gyrodactylus salaris at £633 million with severe consequences to rural communities.
 Estimated cost of clearing Rhodedendrum ponticum from Loch Lomond and Trossachs national park is £25 million.
 Invasive species have already changed the character of iconic landscapes and waterbodies in Scotland reducing the amenity value in those areas.

There is also a growing recognition of translocated species. These are native species that have been transported outside their natural range and can also have severe ecological impacts. It is important to note that once a species gains a foothold then it can be very difficult and expensive to eradicate.

At the moment there are approximately 20 biosecurity plans being drawn up and implemented through the Rivers and Fisheries Trusts of Scotland
( RAFTS) as part of a national programme of action with support from the Scottish Government, Scottish Natural Heritage, Scottish Environment Protection Agency and the Esmee Fairburn Foundation.





The vision is
“ To establish a sustainable framework leading to the prevention, detection, control and eradication of Invasive non-native species within the Fisheries Trust region. This will be undertaken through the
application of appropriate management activities, data collection, liason, education and legislation.”
There are three main objectives in the realisation of this vision and are in accordance with established protocols for fish diseases and with the three key elements of the GB Invasive Non Native species Framework Strategy;
1) Prevention - Prevent introduction and spread of new INNS and fish diseases.
2) Early detection, surveillance, monitoring and rapid response - Establish optimum surveillance and monitoring and rapid response mechanisms for identified INNS and fish diseases which pose significant threats to local biodiversity and economy.
3) Mitigation, control and eradication - Effective control and eradication programmes for existing INNS and fish diseases.

The plans will describe the biosecurity issues of each Fisheries Trust area and will present the actions agreed with the stakeholders for the prevention, early detection and eradication of selected INNS. Key stakeholders include AAG ( Invasive species forum) Catchment groups, SNH, SEPA, District Salmon Fishery Boards and local councils ( Local biodiversity Action Forums)The aims and objectives of the plan will be achieved through a partnership approach in order to implement any actions. Ultimately the key to the effectiveness of the plan will be the building of local awareness, capacity and partnerships so as to ensure the success and long term sustainability of the presented actions. The implementation of this plan will bring many benefits to the local area:
 Conservation and enhancement of local biodiversity
 Protection of genetically distinct fish species
 Restoration and improvement to aquatic habitats for a wide range of flora and fauna
 Increased contribution of fisheries to the local economy.

In addition the plan will build on existing local plans:
 Fisheries Trust Management Plan
 River basin district management plans
 Catchment management plans
 Local Biodiversity Action plans
 Conservation objectives of Special areas of conservation, sites of special scientific interest and special protection areas.








Current threats.

There are a number of species already gaining a foothold in Scotland, some of these have been recorded, due to location and terrain it would be easy for many species to go unnoticed, it is therefore essential that if any of the following species are discovered anywhere then they should be reported to your local SNH,SEPA or Fisheries Trust office.

Hymalayan Balsam
Japanese Knotweed
American Signal Crayfish
American Mink
Giant Hogweed

Gyrodactylus Salaris

A monogenean parasite belonging to the family Gyrodactylidae. G. salaris is a freshwater parasite of Atlantic salmon. Since first observed in Norway in 1975 it has had devastating effects on Norwegian Salmon rivers.It has never been recorded in the Uk and is a category 1 notifiable disease.
G. salaris requires only a single host and is viviparous ( gives birth to live young) and can produce 1000’s of offspring. The lack of immunity in Norwegian Salmon parr stocks led to devastating mortalities. Since first observed there has been an estimated loss of over 300 tonnes of fish. Within 10 years it had spread to 28 rivers and 11 hatcheries. Salmon parr populations in rivers reduced by 50% within two years and by 96% in five years. Affected rivers were treated with Rotenone killing all fish in the river. In some cases the fauna has re-established and stocks recovered, not all treatments have been successful and re-infection has occurred.
Stocking of infected fish is the most likely means of transfer. The parasite can be transferred in water, equipment or by other aquatic animals. It is therefore of utmost importance that all water users Ie Anglers and canoeists thoroughly disinfect all equipment when moving between not only countries but also catchments. Further information is available via the leaflet “ Keep Gyrodactylus salaris out of Scottish rivers” published by the Scottish office.

The species described above are just a very small selection of the current threats, more information can be found at www.nonnativespecies.org along with descriptors and information sheets.
The threat is real and needs to be addressed locally, we need to clean our own doorstep, if all user groups, stakeholders and the general public pull together and are aware we can and will end this threat to our local environment, economy and lifestyle. Anglers can help in a big way, by observing the need for disinfection between catchments and acting as “eyes” they can report any unusual observations. If in doubt contact your nearest fisheries trust office or Sepa. If these species gain a foothold our sport, economy and lifestyle could be affected.

Chris Daphne Assistant Biologist West Sutherland Fisheries Trust and Sutherland Partnership Biodiversity Group.


I must also say that in my area we are very lucky, we have very few invasives, just the odd pocket of Balsam and Knotweed. Mink are absent as too are Crayfish. We are probably the only area without these species...At the moment.
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James Page



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PostSubject: Re: River Thames Invasive Species Forum   Fri Jan 29, 2010 7:17 pm

thats a pukka one fella, where else could I have learnt all that, there are obviously some problems we share with you further north, it would seem that recognising these invasive species early can be very advantageous, us anglers, if we know what to look for can certainly do that, we engage in litter picks, could we not also engage in removing some of these invasive plants, perhaps some pics on our site for identification purposes would be a good idea, over to you cass
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Chris Daphne
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PostSubject: Re: River Thames Invasive Species Forum   Fri Jan 29, 2010 7:34 pm

Thats the thing with invasives and rivers, they are excellent transport mechanisms not too disimilar to roads. INNS is not a local thing it's a national problem, by raising awareness, and this involves everybody, from anglers, water users to garden centres, fish suppliers etc, prevention of any introductions can be achieved.
A prime example in our area is the Minnow. This species is not native to Sutherland, in fact we have only a few fish species dominated by Salmonids. Minnows have been introduced by anglers using them as bait and discarding them when finished. Now the Minnow as we know is a fairly insignificant fish but if you can imagine thousands spawning in juvenile Salmonid nursery habitat and then these young Salmon/Trout get pushed out or outcompeted. You then get a significant drop in numbers of the native species. This then has an economic/social impact as my area is game angling tourist hotspot. The majority of income is gained from visiting Trout and Salmon anglers. So the humble Minnow is VERY significant. I just dread someone introducing a major predator.
In addition removal of any invasive must be undertaken with great care, Knotweed being a prime example. This should not be moved once treated as it can regrow and should be burnt on site.

Pictures and reference sheets can be found on the link in the article, i have photos of some species and will post once i have uploaded them.
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James Page



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PostSubject: Re: River Thames Invasive Species Forum   Fri Jan 29, 2010 7:44 pm

nice one fella, keep it simple, so that dimwits like me dont do the wrong thing, thinking we're doing the right, knotweed is a prime example, although himalyan balsam I think we can uproot without any problems, both are prevalent on the bank near richmond
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CassEdwards

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PostSubject: Re: River Thames Invasive Species Forum   Fri Jan 29, 2010 7:55 pm

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Last edited by CassEdwards on Thu Mar 17, 2011 7:41 pm; edited 5 times in total
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Chris Daphne
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PostSubject: Re: River Thames Invasive Species Forum   Fri Jan 29, 2010 8:28 pm

The thing that amazes me is most invasives ( in particular plants ) are here as a result of ornamental gardens - even Hogweed.
Knotweed can be treated by stem injecting or spraying. This may need several treatments and again is not 100%. There are trials underway using a biological control - i think it is a Beetle, but then what if the Beetle then becomes invasive.
Balsam can be uprooted.

Thanks for the info re Zebra Mussels, this is another species we are concerned about, we have quite a few fishfarms in our area and often wellboats etc deballast, another transport mechanism. We have some marine invasives slowly creeping in including a form of sea squirt and wireweed.
I have not seen Zebra Mussels before and i am astounded at the amounts. Unbelievable. I think we have a good opportunity to raise awareness on this site. Forgive me if i go off on the odd tangent, like i said i know very little of the Thames and hope i can relate what i know to help. Having said that i will be making a concerted effort to learn more about your river and catchments.
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Chris Daphne
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PostSubject: Re: River Thames Invasive Species Forum   Sat Jan 30, 2010 12:18 am

http://www.invasivespeciesscotland.org.uk/biosecurity_programme/rafts_biosecurity_programme.asp

You will find some useful information on loads of INNS on this site.
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Stephen Leader



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PostSubject: Invasive species   Tue Feb 02, 2010 11:16 am

The Surrey comet has today published on its web site that the Asian Clam has been found at Molesey the first in the non tidal THAMES THOUGHT THIS WOULD BE OF INTREST
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CassEdwards

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PostSubject: Re: River Thames Invasive Species Forum   Wed Feb 03, 2010 7:05 pm

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Last edited by CassEdwards on Thu Mar 17, 2011 7:41 pm; edited 1 time in total
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David Harvey

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PostSubject: Re: River Thames Invasive Species Forum   Wed Feb 24, 2010 5:40 pm

Was on the news today..

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/8533461.stm

and http://www.defra.gov.uk/wildlife-pets/wildlife/management/non-native/index.htm


http://www.defra.gov.uk/news/2010/100224a.htm


All good advice but no menetion that I can see of an action plan to clear up the waterways. One to be followed up, for the future.
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James Page



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PostSubject: Re: River Thames Invasive Species Forum   Tue Apr 20, 2010 8:28 am

figured mink might fit in this thread, so if you've seen any post'em on 'ere
seen one between sunbury and hampton court, and another on the river mole where it joins the thames, both last season
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